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Learn! Play!

Looking for things to do with kids that are fun and encourage learning about nature at the same time? PEPtBO’s Get Out! Kids’ Club and NatureHood Program provides loads of resources for you

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Go Birding!

Whether you’re a beginner or experienced birder, there’s a world of joy out there for everyone. Look here for good places to bird in Prince Edward County, advice on how to get started and other resources.

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Volunteer!

Wishing you could get up close and personal with birds? Would you like to help PEPtBO as a banding assistant, intern, board member, special events volunteer, fundraiser or citizen scientist?

Follow us on social media for news and updates

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An update from our BIC (Bander-In-Charge), Philip Mercier:

“This time of year we are nearing the end of breeding season, therefore what we are starting to see are dispersing juveniles and molt migrants. Dispersing juveniles are birds that were born away from the individual MAPS stations that make their way into our area and then get banded. 

Birds like the Northern Parula and Northern Waterthrush that we banded today at the Miller Family Nature Reserve were never seen or encountered until today, giving us a strong indication of juvenile dispersal. 

Another thing we will be starting to see is molt migrants. These are birds that finished breeding up north and came halfway down south to molt their flight feathers before making the bigger migratory jump for the winter.”

An update from our BIC (Bander-In-Charge), Philip Mercier:

“This time of year we are nearing the end of breeding season, therefore what we are starting to see are dispersing juveniles and molt migrants. Dispersing juveniles are birds that were born away from the individual MAPS stations that make their way into our area and then get banded.

Birds like the Northern Parula and Northern Waterthrush that we banded today at the Miller Family Nature Reserve were never seen or encountered until today, giving us a strong indication of juvenile dispersal.

Another thing we will be starting to see is molt migrants. These are birds that finished breeding up north and came halfway down south to molt their flight feathers before making the bigger migratory jump for the winter.”
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We have some very exciting news to share with all of you, the Observatory will be open to visitors again beginning August 15th (the start of our fall banding season)! 🍂

We will be closely following COVID safety regulations by allowing a maximum of 100 people on site, where masks will be required. Trails are still closed due to the difficulty of maintaining social distancing. Inside the station is also closed to the general public, however the station offers big windows for observation and banding demonstrations will be provided outside. 

For more information, please visit our website and sign up for the newsletter (link in our bio).

We have some very exciting news to share with all of you, the Observatory will be open to visitors again beginning August 15th (the start of our fall banding season)! 🍂

We will be closely following COVID safety regulations by allowing a maximum of 100 people on site, where masks will be required. Trails are still closed due to the difficulty of maintaining social distancing. Inside the station is also closed to the general public, however the station offers big windows for observation and banding demonstrations will be provided outside.

For more information, please visit our website and sign up for the newsletter (link in our bio).
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Have you ever thought about the colour of birds? Feather colouration plays a vital role for two main reasons: attracting a mate and protecting birds from predators. 

The dark colour of certain feathers (black, brown) comes from a molecule called melanin. Melanin is very strong, and can resist a great deal of daily wear and tear. You will find that the tips of many bird feathers are a darker colour for this exact reason. Melanin can be found in many species of Owl and Hawk. 

Carotenoids are another group of molecules which create reds, oranges, and yellows. Carotenoids require the process of photosynthesis to be created, and so birds get them from plants (sometimes from bacteria and fungi as well). Carotenoids can be found in species such as the Northern Cardinal. 

The last molecules are called porphyrins. They are produced by modifying animo acids, and create a range of colours including pinks, browns, reds and greens. Porphyrin can be found in species of Grouse and Pigeon.

Have you ever thought about the colour of birds? Feather colouration plays a vital role for two main reasons: attracting a mate and protecting birds from predators.

The dark colour of certain feathers (black, brown) comes from a molecule called melanin. Melanin is very strong, and can resist a great deal of daily wear and tear. You will find that the tips of many bird feathers are a darker colour for this exact reason. Melanin can be found in many species of Owl and Hawk.

Carotenoids are another group of molecules which create reds, oranges, and yellows. Carotenoids require the process of photosynthesis to be created, and so birds get them from plants (sometimes from bacteria and fungi as well). Carotenoids can be found in species such as the Northern Cardinal.

The last molecules are called porphyrins. They are produced by modifying animo acids, and create a range of colours including pinks, browns, reds and greens. Porphyrin can be found in species of Grouse and Pigeon.
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Another throwback to PEPtBO’s spring migration banding. Any guesses on what bird this is? Comment below ⬇️ 

Hints: 

1. This warbler spends a great deal of time on the ground 

2. They breed mainly in Canada’s boreal forest

3. They are known for their “tail-wagging” movement 

4. The males sing a buzzy trill (similar to that of a Song Sparrow)

Another throwback to PEPtBO’s spring migration banding. Any guesses on what bird this is? Comment below ⬇️

Hints:

1. This warbler spends a great deal of time on the ground

2. They breed mainly in Canada’s boreal forest

3. They are known for their “tail-wagging” movement

4. The males sing a buzzy trill (similar to that of a Song Sparrow)
...